Indoor Spa Room

Top Indoor Spa Room Design Considerations

Indoor hot tubs address privacy and usability concerns many homeowners share. Unlike in backyards, you can bathe indoors without worrying about nosy neighbours. Likewise, the weather will never influence when or how often you go for a dip.

Today, homeowners commonly install spas in master bathrooms, sunrooms and basements. However, not every home suits an indoor spa. Before buying or installing one, you must first consult electricians, HVAC contractors and engineers. These professionals know how to assess the structural integrity, accessibility and serviceability of your home.

Structural Factors

Your home needs to support the weight of a hot tub. When filled to the brim, a medium-sized spa can exceed 6000 pounds! Even if the floor strength checks out, you need to account for its humidity. Without proper ventilation, moisture can collect and cause mold or other framework deterioration.

Generally, spa areas need to be water-tolerant. This includes anti-slip flooring, spill drains and walls of cement or glass. Ideally, your enclosure will also have a vapour barrier to regulate the temperature and prevent air contamination elsewhere in the home.

Accessibility Factors

Hot tubs in the home suit corner spaces. They are less intrusive there and easier to divide from other living spaces. Whichever corner you choose needs access to a bathroom or other dressing area. After all, who wants to parade through a home soaking wet to reach a towel or dry pair of clothes?

Serviceability Factors

The location of your hot tub should be convenient to service. Technicians need access to the spa’s mechanical components for setup and troubleshooting. Similarly, you need to drain the spa throughout the year. Where in the home your spa rests will determine how difficult this is.

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