Spruce Up Your Garden This Spring

Spruce Up Your Garden This Spring

As the last remnants of winter melt away, the days grow longer and the temperatures rise, many of us are starting to truly feel the arrival of spring. And we’re not the only ones! Nature feels it too and that includes your garden. As spring weather arrives on the scene, plants awake from their winter slumber, ready to soak up the sun. But, is your garden ready the awakening of its inhabitants? Use the tips below to get your garden ready for this spring.

Do Some Cleaning

Before you add in any new plant life, make sure to clean out your garden. This means removing plants that died over the winter, weeds that are beginning to sprout up in the spring and other debris that the winter has left behind. 

Add Feed for the Soil

After doing some cleaning, your garden is now ready for feeding. Spreading feed into your garden’s soil is excellent for adding the ideal nutrients for plant growth. This step helps to optimize plant growth, ensure you get the best colours from your plants and extend plant life. Healthy soil also looks and smells good!

Do Your Homework on New Flowers and Shrubs for Your Garden

When purchasing plants for your garden, don’t just buy randomly or go by what’s there at the moment, these decisions need to start at home with research. Your garden is a canvas and you want to create a visual on this canvas that you can appreciate and that fits with the overall theme of your backyard space. The following are key points to consider when you’re picking plants:

  • The climate in which you live;
  • The direction of your garden (i.e., north or south facing);
  • The amount of work you’re willing to put into maintaining your garden;
  • And the type of soil you have.

For more information on the above points, as well as other gardening tips, click here!

Check the Health of Older Plants

With older plants that are already established in your garden, make sure to show them some TLC this spring. Prune the sections that need trimming and examine them for any winter damage, like frosting.